Text tool: entering text into an area

In the last lesson, we looked at the basics of working with the Text tool in Photoshop. I have already mentioned that in the program there are two ways to enter text – input by string and into an area. In the last lesson, we learned to enter text in a string. In this lesson, we will look at entering text into an area, which will make it easy to enter large amounts of text in several lines into a pre-selected area.

As we have studied with you, in order to add text to a document in either of two ways, we use the tool “Horizontal text” (Type Tool), which is on the toolbar. We can also select this tool by pressing the T key:

Select the horizontal text tool in the toolbar

Selecting the tool “Horizontal text”, then we set the desired font in the settings panel using font options:

From left to right – options “Font”, “Outline” and “Size”

We can also choose any color for our text by clicking on the color swatch icon on the settings panel. By default, the text color is black, but if we click on a color pattern, a Color Picker opens, where we can choose a different color if we want. In my case, I will leave black for text:

Click on the color swatch icon in the settings panel to select a different color for the text.

And finally, we can set the text layout on the settings panel using text alignment options – on the left, center, or on the right. By default, the option is selected. “Left Alignment” (Left Align Text):

From left to right – alignment options on the left edge, on the center and on the right edge.

Enter text by string

The difference between entering text in a line and into an area is that in the first case the program simply adds text to the specified place where we click the mouse with the selected tool. “Horizontal text” (Type Tool). This method is most popular, because in most cases we need to add a few words of text in one line, and this is most convenient to do just by typing text in a line.

When entering text with a string, we simply select the “Text” tool, click the mouse to the right place and start typing.

Until we manually enter a line break when entering text with a string, all of our text will be added as a single string, and if we continue typing, it will even go beyond the document:

When entering text in a string, too much text may even go beyond the document.

In order to split the text into several lines, we need to manually add a line break by pressing the Enter (Win) / Return (Mac) key, which resembles the use of vintage typewriters:

Press the key Enter (Win) / Return (Mac) to add line breaks when entering text with a string

Entering text into an area

If we use text input in a string to add large text fragments, we may find it inconvenient to work. A good solution would be to enter the text in the area, because it will allow us to place the text in a predetermined area, while the transition to a new line will be carried out automatically as you reach the edge of the frame

Printing in the area does not require the use of special tools. We use the same tool. “Horizontal text” (Type Tool) as when entering text with a string. The difference is in how we work with this tool. In order to add text in a line, we simply click in the right place and start typing. To add text to an area, we select the Horizontal Text tool, and while holding the mouse button down, we stretch the frame for future text entry, much the same way as we drew the selection with the Rectangular Selection tool. We can set a square-shaped frame by pressing and holding down the Shift key as the cursor moves:

To add text to an area, select the Horizontal Text tool and, while holding the mouse button down, drag a box for future text entry.

Release the mouse button when you finish moving the cursor, and the program creates a frame for future text input, similar in appearance to the Free Transform command frame, having markers (small squares) for resizing, which we will discuss later:

When you release the mouse button, the program will create a frame for entering text.

As soon as you draw a frame, inside it, in the upper left corner, a flashing cursor will appear (provided that the option “Align with the left edge” is selected). To add text, just start typing:

By default, the text will start to be printed in the upper left corner of the frame.

Once you reach the edge of the frame, the program will automatically transfer the text to the next line. There is no need to manually add line breaks:

When you enter text into an area, the program automatically transfers text to the next line.

If you need to move your text box, you need to move it. You’ll be able to “I-beam” into the Move Tool. Click on the text box to continue typing:

If you need to move the text entry frame inside the document while adding text, move the mouse cursor outside the frame. The cursor will temporarily change its appearance as when working with the tool. “Moving” (Move Tool). Move the text box to the new location, then continue typing:

Move the cursor outside the frame to temporarily switch to the Move tool.

To confirm text entry, click on the checkmark in the settings panel. Or if you have a numeric keypad, press the Enter key on it. If you do not have such a panel, you can press Ctrl + Enter (Win) / Command + Return (Mac). However, remember that simply pressing the normal Enter key on the keyboard will add line breaks, as well as in the case of entering text with the line:

Clicking on the checkmark in the settings panel is one way to confirm text entry.

After confirming the text, the frame will disappear, and only the text itself will remain:

The text entry frame is only visible when we add or edit text.

As in the case of entering text with a string, the program places the text print area on a separate layer and uses the first part of the text as the layer name:

The program places the text on a separate layer and when entering text in a line, and when entering text in the area

To display the text input frame again, click anywhere inside the text with the tool selected. “Horizontal text” (Type Tool). As a result, you will return to text editing mode, and the frame will reappear:

Click anywhere inside the text with the Horizontal Text tool selected to display the text input frame again.

We can select the text within the frame in the same way as we did when entering text with a string. To select a single letter, click to the left or right of the letter with the “Horizontal Text” tool selected and hold the mouse button down and drag the cursor to highlight the letter:

Drag the mouse to highlight a single letter.

To quickly select a whole word, double click on it:

Double-click on a word to select it at once.

To select the entire line in the text, click three times anywhere on this line:

Click the mouse button three times to select a whole line of text.

To select all the text inside the frame, double click on the text layer thumbnail in the layers panel:

Double click on the text layer thumbnail.

This action will allow you to select all the text at once:

All text inside the frame is now highlighted.

Selecting all the text, I can easily replace it with another text, simply by typing the desired text. And again, as you reach the edge of the frame, the program will automatically transfer the text to a new line:

Replaceinitialtextnew

Please note that not all the text fit within my frame. How do we know about this? As soon as the text exceeds the size of the frame and goes beyond its borders, an overflow symbol appears in the lower right corner of the frame (similar to the small plus sign inside the square). I zoomed in to make it easier to see:

The overflow symbol gives us a sign that part of the text is out of the box.

There are several ways to solve this problem. First, you can simply select and edit the text to fit in the frame. If this method does not fit, we can simply change the size of the frame itself. For this we need markers (small squares) located along the perimeter of the frame. Click on one of these markers and, while holding the mouse button down, move the marker to change the size of the frame until the text is inside it. As the marker moves, the program will rearrange the text inside the frame:

To change the size of the frame, click on one of the markers and move it.

When you finish resizing the frame, click on the checkmark in the settings panel, press the Enter key on the numeric keypad, or press Ctrl + Enter (Win) / Command + Enter (Mac) to confirm the changes:

Changing the frame size will allow us to put all the text inside it.

If editing the text or changing the size of the frame does not suit you, another way to fit the text to the size of the frame is to change the size of the text itself and make it smaller. To do this, I double click on the thumbnail of the text layer in the layers panel to select all the text:

After double clicking on the thumbnail of the text layer, all text is highlighted.

After selecting the text, we can go to the settings panel and change any of the font parameters. I will leave the Arial Regular font unchanged, but I will reduce its size to 36 points (initially it was 48 points):

Reduce the font size to fit the text in the frame.

And now all the text fit within the frame. The overflow icon in the lower right corner of the frame has disappeared:

Changing the font size allowed us to fit all the text within the frame.

We are done! To summarize: to add text to a document by typing in a line (the most appropriate way for a small number of words), click on the tool “Horizontal text” (Type Tool), then start typing. To add text to an area (suitable for a large amount of text located on several lines), select the Horizontal Text tool and, while holding the mouse button down, drag the cursor to create a text input frame and then start typing. Next, you can resize the frame if necessary by moving the markers.

So, we looked at the basics of adding text in a line and in an area. In the following lessons, we will explore additional options for working with text that are available on the paragraph bar and on the character panel!

Author: Steve patterson

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