The parameters of the dynamics of the brush in Photoshop – Double brush

In the previous lesson of the “Brush Dynamics Parameters” series, we looked at how to use the options in the “Texture” (Texture) you can add a texture or pattern to our brush print. Section Options “Double brush” (Dual Brush), which we will learn in this lesson, let you mix two different brushes together!

If you have not read past lessons in this series, I would recommend that you go back and view the lesson. Scattering (Scattering) before we continue, since the two main options of the sections “Double brush” and “Scattering” are the same.

For starters, I’m going to choose a different brush imprint, something more interesting than the standard round brush I used until this point. To select a different brush print, I will click on the phrase. “Brush print form” (Brush Tip Shape) in the upper left corner of the panel “Brush” (Brush) and then start scrolling through the list with thumbnails of the brush prints until I find the one I need (or more or less interesting). I will choose a brush “Scattered leaves” (Scattered Leaves) by clicking on its thumbnail:

Select the “Scattered Leaves” brush from the “Brush Print Shape” section of the Brush panel.

Being in the “Brush Print Shape” section, I will increase the size of my brush by clicking on the options bar. “Font” (Diameter) and dragging it to the right. I will also increase the distance between individual brush prints by clicking on the option bar. “Intervals” (Spacing) and dragging it to the right:

Font and Spacing options controls in the Brush Print Shape section of the Brush panel

Selecting a new brush and setting the desired size and spacing between individual prints, I will draw a simple brush stroke, so that we can see what the brush originally looked like. None of the parameters of the dynamics of the brush is currently not available:

Brush stroke “Scattered leaves” without selecting any parameters for the brush dynamics

To access section options “Double brush” (Dual Brush), click on the words “Dual Brush” on the left side of the Brush panel:

To access the options, click on the words “Double brush”

Select the second brush

The first thing you’ll notice when the options for the Double Brush section appear on the right side of the Brush panel are the same thumbnail brush prints as we saw in the Brush Print Shape. The difference is that this time we will choose the second brush, which we mix with the first one! I scroll down the list with thumbnails of brushes down and choose a brush “Scattered Maple Leaves” (Scattered Maple Leaves) by clicking on it. Remember that in this case I do not change the main brush. I choose the second brush to blend it with the first:

All the same brush prints are available in the “Double brush” section. Select the second brush to blend with the first one.

Font Size and Spacing

When I previously selected the first brush in the “Brush Print Shape” section, I had the opportunity to change the brush size by moving the “Font” option slider and increase the distance between the prints by moving the “Intervals” slider. If we look in the “Double Brush” section (below the list of thumbnails), we will see the same options sliders. “Font” (Diameter) and “Intervals” (Spacing), working in the same way as in the “Brush print form” section. The only difference is that these sliders work with the second brush, which we will mix with the first one.

Move the Finger option slider left or right to increase or decrease the size of the second brush, then do the same with the Spacing slider to change the distance between individual brush prints. Look at the preview of the brush stroke at the bottom of the Brush panel to see the changes as you move the sliders:

Runners of the “Font” and “Intervals” options in the “Double brush” section regulate the second brush, and not the first one that we have chosen before.

Now, in the process of drawing a stroke, the prints of the Scattered Maple Leaves brush (the second brush) appear inside the prints of the first brush that we previously selected:

The second brush now appears inside the prints of the first

The effect of “Cookie-Cutter” (“Cookie Cutter” Effect)

Note that the first brush is a kind of frame for the second brush (the “picture-in-picture” effect), i.e. the shape of the second brush will never go beyond the shape of the first brush. No matter how big the second brush will be (it can even be 10 times the size of the first), it will always be limited to the shape of the first brush.

“Scattering” and “Counter”

Also in the “Dual Brush” are parameters Scattering (Scatter) and “Counter” (Count), which work in the same way as in the “Scattering” section, but in this case they adjust the second brush. Move the Scatter slider to the right to scatter the prints of the second brush within the shape of the first brush. Enable the option “Both axes” (Both axes) to scatter prints in all directions. Move the slider of the Counter option to the right to increase the number of copies of the prints of the second brush while drawing a stroke. Always pay attention to the preview area at the bottom of the Brush panel to keep track of changes:

Use the “Scatter” option to scatter the prints of the second brush within the shape of the first brush. The “Counter” option adds additional copies of the second brush prints.

Below is a brush stroke after increasing the values ​​of the “Scatter” and “Counter” options for the second brush. Notice that the second brush is still limited by the shape of the first brush, despite the fact that we scattered the prints of the second brush and increased their number:

Even after increasing the values ​​of the “Scatter” and “Counter” options, the borders of the first brush remain a frame for the second brush.

Blend mode

We can adjust the way the two brushes interact (overlay) using different blending options. “Mode” (Mode) located at the top of the Brush panel. In my case, both brushes were set to “Clarification basics” (Color Dodge):

The option “Mode” allows you to control the method of imposing two brushes

In order to change the blending mode, click on the “Mode” option icon and select the required one from the list that appears. I will change the blending mode to “Overlap” (Overlay):

Change the blending mode from “Brighten Foundation” to “Overlap”

By changing the brush blending modes, we will get a different result, which will depend, in many respects, on which brushes you use. Below is a brush stroke with the Overlap blend mode:

The “Overlap” mode created the effect of “cut leaves”

Let’s try a different blend mode. This time I will choose “Hard Mix” (Hard Mix)

Change the blending mode to “Hard Mix”

When using the “Hard Mix” mode, a smear is approximately the same, but darker in color. Again, the result will depend on which brushes you use:

When using the Hard Mix mode, the smear is darker.

Try different blending modes and choose the one that will give the best results.

Flip option

Finally, select the option Flip (Flip) in the upper right corner of the Brush panel to give a greater variety to the brushstroke, indicating the program to randomly reflect the shape of the second brush in the process of drawing. Like the other options in the Dual Brush section, the Flip option does not affect the first, main brush:

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With the option “Reflect” you can randomly reflect the second imprint of the brush while drawing a stroke

Next, our brushes will become more colorful as we move on to learning the section. “Color Dynamics” (Color Dynamics)!

Or you can go to the study of other parameters of the dynamics of the brush on the links below:

  • “Dynamics of form”
  • Scattering
  • “Texture”
  • “Color Dynamics”

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