The parameters of the dynamics of the brush in Photoshop – Dynamics of color

All the various parameters of the dynamics of the brush, which we considered before, had one thing in common – they worked with the shape of the brush. We learned how to dynamically change the size, angle and roundness of a brush using shape dynamics parameters, how to scatter multiple copies of a brush print using the Scatter options, how to add a brush texture or pattern using the texture section and how to use the “ Double brushes “connect two different brushes into one! In this lesson, we deviate from studying the characteristics of the brush shape and work with color, because the “Color Dynamics” section allows us to control the color tone, saturation and brightness of the brush in the process of drawing and even allows you to randomly change the foreground and background colors!

To access the options in the Color Dynamics section, click on the phrase “Color Dynamics” (Color Dynamics) on the left side of the panel “Brush” (Brushes):

To access the section options, click on the words “Color Dynamics”.

As you click on the phrase, the controls on the Color Dynamics section will appear on the right side of the Brush panel. At first glance, it seems that there are many parameters for controlling the color of the brush, as there are options for saturation, hue, brightness and clarity, and even an option at the top of the panel that somehow works with the foreground and background colors:

The “Dynamics of Color” section includes options for each aspect of color, including color tone, saturation, and brightness.

However, if you look closely, you will notice that the “Color Dynamics” section has only one option. “Control” (Control), and it is bound to a parameter. “Foreground / Background” (Foreground / Background) at the top of the section:

Only the “Foreground / Background” parameter at the top of the section has the “Control” option.

No more headlines (nor “Color tone” (Hue) nor “Saturation” (Saturation), nor “Brightness” (Brightness) nor “Purity” (Purity)) do not have the associated “Manage” option. This means that we cannot control these parameters ourselves with the help of pen pressure, pen pressure and even with the help of the “Transition” option. Instead, to the left of the name of the parameters “Color tone”, “Saturation”, “Brightness” the word is located “Swing” (Jitter):

The parameters “fluctuation of color tone”, “fluctuation of saturation”, “fluctuation of brightness”.

The oscillation, as we already know, means in the program Photoshop “randomness”. Thus, we can use these parameters to randomly change these three characteristics of the brush color during the drawing process! Let’s take a closer look at each of the parameters of the “Dynamics of color” section.

Foreground / Background

As a rule, the program uses the current foreground color as the brush color. So, if we wanted to paint in red, yellow, blue, or any other color, we would need to change the foreground color before we start drawing a brush stroke. But why do we need to set only one color when we can draw with two! Parameter “Foreground / Background” (Foreground / Background) allows us in the process of drawing to switch between the current values ​​of the foreground and background colors!

You can see samples of the current foreground and background colors at the bottom of the toolbar. The top left square is a color swatch. foreground (Foreground), and the bottom right is a color swatch. background (Background). By default, the foreground color is black and the background color is white:

Samples of color front (left upper square) and rear (lower right square) plan.

In order to change any of the colors, click on the sample and select a new color from the color palette. I’m going to paint with a brush “Scattered Maple Leaves” (Scattered Maple Leaves), therefore I will choose colors more traditional for leaves. To start, I’ll set the orange color as the foreground color (nice autumn color) by clicking on the color swatch:

Click once on the foreground color pattern.

This will open the color palette. I will select the desired color and then click OK to close the palette:

Choose orange as the foreground color.

I will do the same for the background color. First, I will click on the color sample in the toolbar:

Click once on the background color pattern.

When the color palette appears on the screen, I will select a calm green color and then click OK again to close the palette:

Select the green color as the background color.

If I again look at the color swatches in the toolbar, I will see that the colors have changed:

Samples now began to display other colors.

By default, Photoshop will draw using only the foreground color. Below is a simple brushstroke (with the selected imprint “Scattered Maple Leaves”) without selecting any option in the “Color Dynamics” section. I added a small angle oscillation (Angle jitter) from “Dynamics of form” (Shape Dynamics) for more variety:

Since the foreground color is set to orange, the program draws in orange.

Control

So far, the result has been expected. The program began to draw the foreground color. Let’s see what happens if I change the option. “Control” (Control) on “Pen pressure” (Pen Pressure):

Change the “Control” option of the “Foreground / Background” parameter to “Pen pressure”.

This time, the program will connect both colors in a brushstroke in a certain way, depending on the degree of pressure of the electronic pen on the tablet surface. With minimal pen pressure, the program will use the background color (green). As the degree of pressure in the center of the stroke increases, orange will be added to the green color (foreground color) and, finally, with the maximum pressure of the pen, we will see only orange. As soon as I weaken the degree of pressure on the tablet, finishing with a stroke, the program will gradually return to green (the background color):

The program now mixes the foreground and background colors in the process of drawing a stroke, depending on the degree of pressure.

If you do not have a graphics tablet, you can try the command “Transition” (Fade), which works in the same way as in other categories of parameters of the dynamics of the brush, which we considered earlier. After you select the “Transition” command from the drop-down list of the “Management” option, specify the number of steps for which the program should switch from one color to another. In my case, I will point out 10 steps:

Enter the number of steps needed to change from the foreground color to the background color.

If I draw a new brush stroke, we will see that in 10 prints the color of the leaves has changed from orange (foreground color) to green (background color). Further, only the background color was used:

The color of the leaves changed from orange (foreground color) to green (background color) in 10 steps.

Swing

We can also set the program to randomly switch in the drawing process between the foreground and background colors using the slider option “Swing” (Jitter). Moving the slider to the right increases the maximum possible percentage of background color that the program can add to the stroke. For example, below you can see that I set the value of the Foreground / Background Vibration option to 25%:

Increase the value of the Foreground / Background Fluctuate option to 25%.

This will allow the program to randomly add up to 25% of the background color to the foreground color, giving the leaves a subtle tint:

Only 25% of the background color can be randomly added to the foreground color.

Below is another brush stroke, but this time the slider is set at 50%. This means that the program can add up to 50% of the background color to the foreground color. As a result, a more noticeable green tint is seen on individual leaves:

Up to 50% of the background color is now mixed with the foreground color.

With a swing value of 75%, we can see even more green:

A swing value of 75% means that up to 75% of the background color will blend with the foreground color.

And finally, if we set the slider to 100%, the program will fully regulate the percentage of foreground and background colors for each new print:

If the oscillation value is 100%, the program will use both colors and any shades.

Next, we look at the controls for the “Hue”, “Saturation”, “Brightness”, and “Cleanliness” parameters!

Color tone fluctuation

The “Color tone fluctuation”, “Saturation oscillation” and “Brightness oscillation” options in the “Color dynamics” section work in a similar way with the “Foreground / background oscillation” option that we just considered. Each of them randomly controls a particular aspect of the color in the process of drawing a brush stroke. “Color tone” is a color characteristic that most people see as color itself. Moving the option slider “Fluctuation of color tone” (Hue Jitter) to the right, we ask the program to randomly change the color of our brush. The further we move the slider, the more diverse the colors will be.

By default, the color tone fluctuation is 0%, which means “Off” (off). With this value, the program will simply draw with the current foreground color, which in my case is orange (I turned off the “Foreground / background oscillation and“ Control ”options). I will add a small element of randomness to the color of the brush, increasing the value of “Color tone fluctuation” to 10%:

Move the slider to the right to increase the value of the “Color tone fluctuation” up to 10%.

A color tone fluctuation of 10% means that the brush drawing program can choose colors that are in the color wheel within 10% of the foreground color. If I draw a brush stroke, it will become clear that all random colors are very similar to the original orange color:

The color of the leaves can be randomly selected, but with a color tone variation of 10%, the colors are similar to the original.

If I increase the hue variation value to 25%, the program will be able to choose colors that are in the color wheel within 25% of the current foreground color. Now we see more variety in color shades, but still the colors are still similar:

With a color tone variation of 25%, more diversity is seen in the color shades.

When the color tone fluctuation value is 50%, the leaf color becomes quite diverse, since the program can choose a color from a large number of options:

If the color tone fluctuation value is 50%, the program can choose any color within 50% of the foreground color in the color wheel.

If we increase the value of the color tone fluctuation to 100%, we will get completely different colors, since the program can now use any color shade:

Perhaps there are not so many blue maple leaves in nature, but with a color tone fluctuation value of 100%, the program can choose any color.

Saturation fluctuation

Option “Saturation fluctuation” (Saturation Jitter) works in the same way as the “Tone Color Jitter”, but this parameter randomly changes the color of the brush during the drawing process. By default, the option value is 0%, but when the slider is moved to the right, the program will randomly adjust the degree of color saturation. The further we move the slider, the more varied the degree of color saturation.

I will start with a “Saturation Saturation” value of 25%:

Move the slider to the right to set the value of “Saturation fluctuation” equal to 25%.

The value of the “Saturation fluctuation” option, equal to 25%, means that the program can randomly change the degree of color saturation, but only within 25% of the initial degree of foreground color saturation. Below you can see that the difference in colors is barely noticeable:

The value of the “Saturation fluctuation” option sets how much the degree of saturation of colors can differ during the drawing process.

If I increase the saturation fluctuation value to 50%, then the program, as the stroke is drawn, will be able to choose any degree of saturation within 50% of the original degree. In my case, we now see that some leaves have become gray in color:

Your result will depend on the initial foreground color saturation level.
If the “Saturation saturation” value is equal to 100%, the program can set any degree of saturation and draw each new print with both saturated color and completely unsaturated color:

By setting the value of “Saturation Vibration” to 100%, you will enable the program to set the degree of color saturation itself.

Brightness fluctuations

Option “Brightness fluctuation” (Brightness Jitter) allows the program to randomly select the brightness of the brush in the process of drawing. It works in the same way as the “Color tone fluctuation” and “Saturation fluctuation” options. Moving the slider to the right, we will add an element of randomness to the choice of brightness values. The further the slider is moved, the greater the difference in brightness values. I will increase the brightness fluctuation value to 25%:

Move the slider to the right to set the value of “Brightness fluctuation” equal to 25%
With a value of 25%, we see a slight difference in the degree of brightness, since the program is limited in the choice of values ​​by a range of 25% from the initial level of brightness of the foreground color:

The value of the “Brightness fluctuation” option sets how much the degrees of brightness of colors may differ during the drawing process.

If I increase the value to 50%, then it will be possible to see the difference in the brightness levels of the prints – individual leaves will become much darker:

The program can now select any brightness level within 50% of the original color brightness level.

And, finally, by setting the value “Brightness fluctuations” to 100%, you will give the program the opportunity to set any brightness level for each new print itself:

By setting the value of “Brightness fluctuations” to 100%, you will give the program complete freedom in choosing the brightness value.

Purity

Option “Purity” (Purity), located under the options of variations in color tone, saturation and brightness, is responsible for the overall color saturation of the brush. Unlike the “Saturation saturation” option, which allows you to randomly change the color saturation during a stroke, the “Purity” option has nothing to do with the concept of randomness. We can use this parameter to increase or decrease the saturation of the brush color by moving the saturation slider to the right or left. The resulting color saturation will remain unchanged until we again move the slider. If you simultaneously draw the foreground and background colors using the “Foreground / background oscillations” option, the “Cleanliness” option will affect both colors.

By default, “Clean” is 0%, which means there is no effect on color saturation:

The “Purity” option controls the overall color saturation of the brush and does not depend on the “Saturation fluctuation” option.

To reduce color saturation, simply move the parameter slider to the left. The further the slider moves to the left, the lower the saturation level becomes. I will reduce the value to -50%:

Move the slider to the left to reduce the color saturation of the brush.

If I draw a stroke, we will see that the saturation level of the brush color has become much lower. I set the value of the “Foreground / Background wobble” option to 100% so that both colors are used in the drawing process. Please note that this time random variations in the color saturation level are not visible. The change we made using the “Clean” option applies to the entire stroke and affects both colors: foreground (Foreground) and color background (Background):

Reducing saturation with the “Clean” option gives the leaves a subdued shade.

To increase the degree of color saturation, move the “Clean” slider to the right. I will move the slider to the “+ 50%” mark:

Move the slider to the right to increase the color saturation of the brush.

In my case, however, an increase in the value of the “Clean” option did not greatly change the saturation of the original foreground and background colors, since the original colors were already quite saturated. If I chose low saturation colors, the difference would be more noticeable:

For colors that are originally saturated, changing the option “Clean” will not be very noticeable

And here we are done! Next we look at the sixth and last category of parameters of the dynamics of the brush “Other Dynamics” (Other Dynamics).

Or you can go to the study of other parameters of the dynamics of the brush on the links below:

  • “Dynamics of form”
  • Scattering
  • “Texture”
  • “Double brush”

Like this post? Please share to your friends: