The parameters of the dynamics of the brush in Photoshop – Scattering

In the first lesson on the study of the dynamics of brushes, we looked at how you can dynamically control the size, angle and shape of the brush in the process of drawing with the help of “Brush shape dynamics” – one of the six categories of brush dynamics parameters located on the Brush panel.

In this lesson we will study the second category of parameters of the dynamics of the brush – Scattering (Scattering), which allows you to scatter multiple copies of the fingerprint of the brush shape while drawing a single stroke, creating a feeling of “spraying” the brush inside the document!

To access the controls in this category, click on the word “Scattering” itself, located on the left side of the Brush panel. If you click inside the window to the left of the name of the category of dynamics, then you simply turn on the “Scattering” options, but do not get access to the controls, so make sure that you click on the word:

Click on the word “Scattering” to access the controls

As soon as you click on the word “Scattering”, various control tools will appear on the right side of the Brush panel for options for the parameters of this category, which are divided into two main sections – Scattering (Scatter) and “Counter” (Count). The Scatter options control how much individual brush prints will be scattered from each other, while the Count parameter determines how many additional brush prints will be added during the brush stroke:

The “Scattering” category includes two sections: “Scattering” and “Counter”

Let’s look at each of the sections in more detail.

Scattering

As I mentioned, section options Scattering (Scatter) allow us to regulate how far apart individual prints will appear in the drawing process, i.e. how far they will be scattered. For ease of understanding of the parameters, I will choose one of the standard round brushes of Photoshop, but you, in turn, can use any other brush.
If the “Scatter” parameter is set to 0%, there will be no scatter of prints, as we can see on the horizontal brush stroke. I increased the intervals between the individual prints so that it was better to see how they follow one after another in a straight line:

A value of “Scattering” of 0% means that the scatter of prints is turned off.

Each new brush imprint is predictably drawn along the same line as the previous one.
In order to increase the degree of dispersion, simply move the parameter slider to the right. Look at the preview of the brush stroke at the bottom of the Brush panel to see the changes. The further you move the slider, the more there will be a spread on the sides of the individual brush prints:

Move the Scatter slider to the right to scatter brush prints

I will draw another horizontal brush stroke, but now, after I added scatter, we can see that the program randomly changes the position of each new brush print relative to the general direction line of the brush stroke, creating a scatter effect. If I had moved the “Scattering” slider even further away, the prints would have been scattered around to a greater extent:

As you draw a brush stroke, the brush prints become scattered.

Both axes

To add more variety to the scattering process, select the options “Both axes” (Both axes):

Check the box in the box “Both axes” to select it.

As a result of this action, the program will scatter brush prints not only along the stroke line, but also perpendicular to it, and some prints will overlap, while the intervals between other prints will increase:

After selecting the option “Both axes”, brush prints will start to be scattered randomly in all directions.

Scatter Control

As well as in the case of the “Size”, “Tilt angle” and “Form” parameters in the “Dynamics of form” section, Photoshop provides us with various ways to dynamically control the degree of dispersion of brush strokes during the drawing process, each of which can be selected from drop down options “Control” (Control):

The same options that we studied in the “Dynamics of form” section allow you to control the degree of dispersion

Most of these options, such as “Pen pressure” (Pen Pressure) and “Pen Tilt” (Pen Tilt), requires us to have a connected graphics tablet for proper operation. After selecting the option “Pen pressure” the degree of dispersion (dispersion) of prints will depend on the degree of pressure of the pen on the tablet, while the option “Tilt the pen” changes the degree of dispersion of prints depending on the inclination of the electronic pen. The only option for which no graphics tablet is needed is “Transition” (Fade). It is responsible for consistently reducing the degree of dispersion of prints over a certain number of steps, which you define yourself. As soon as the degree of dispersion reaches 0%, the scatter of prints will cease to exist until you begin to draw a new stroke:

Select the option “Transition” and specify the number of steps for which the scatter of prints will completely stop being implemented.

Make sure that you first increase the value of the “Dispersion” parameter before you start working with the “Control” option, otherwise there will be no dispersion of the prints in any of your future actions. In my case, I painted a simple horizontal brush stroke, setting the number of scattering steps to 10. Notice how the brush stroke went into a straight line after the scattering (scatter) of the prints had completely ended:

The scatter (scattering) of the prints will gradually stop in 10 steps, and the brush stroke will turn into a straight line.

Counter

We already know that the program draws a brush stroke by repeating brush prints multiple times. By default, one fingerprint is drawn in one step, but we can change this condition with the option “Counter” (Count). In fact, in one step, we can tell Photoshop to draw up to 16 prints, while in normal mode only one typos is drawn at a time.

To increase the value of the Counter parameter, move the parameter slider to the right, tracking changes along the preview area located at the bottom of the Brush panel. Make sure that you first increase the value of the “Scattering” parameter before moving the “Counter” slider to the right, otherwise the changes will not be visible, since you will simply overlay multiple copies of the brush prints one on another:

Move the “Counter” slider to the right to add as many copies as possible of a typo in the brush drawing process.

Setting the value of the parameter “Counter” to 8, and the parameter “Scattering” – 500%, we will get a full spread of brush prints throughout the document in the process of drawing:

To achieve the full “Scatter” effect, simultaneously increase the “Scatter” and “Counter” values.

Counter Management

As well as the “Scattering” section, the “Counter” section includes the option “Control” (Control), which presents us with familiar ways of dynamically managing the number of prints. Choose any method from the drop-down list:

Choose from the drop-down list how you want to dynamically adjust the number of prints.

Before choosing a control method, make sure that you increase the value of the “Counter” parameter by moving the slider, otherwise you will only see one drawn typo per step, no matter which option you choose. The value of the “Counter” parameter determines the maximum number of brush prints that Photoshop will draw at one time. For example, if you select the “Pen pressure” option and set the “Counter” parameter value to 8, at the maximum pen pressure on the tablet, you simultaneously add 8 brush prints to the brush stroke.

And as usual in this case, “Transition” (Fade) is the only option that does not require a tablet for drawing. It gradually reduces the number of prints in a certain number of steps, which you set yourself. This time I will choose the option “Pen pressure” (Pen Pressure), and I will select it both for the “Scattering” parameter and for the “Counter” parameter so that both these parameters dynamically depend on the degree of pressure of the electronic pen on the tablet surface. Below is a brush stroke, which I got in the process of drawing:

The values ​​of both parameters (“Scattering” and “Counter”) are regulated by pen pressure

Counter oscillation

And finally, we can set Photoshop to randomly change the values ​​of the Counter parameter using the option “Swing” (Jitter). The further you move the “Swing” option slider to the right, the stronger the degree of randomness of adding additional brush prints will be in the process of drawing a stroke. Remember that first you need to increase the value of the parameter “Counter” (Count), which defaults to 1, in order to see further changes. The “Swing” option can be used by itself to completely randomize the number of additions of brush prints, or in combination with one of the options in the “Manage” parameter of the counter:

Increasing the value of the “Oscillation” option, add a random character to the number of adding additional brush prints along the stroke line.

We have already discussed how to dynamically control the size, angle and shape of the brush using the parameters of the “Dynamics of the form” section, as well as how to scatter multiple copies of the brush imprint using the parameters of the “Scattering” section. Next, we will learn how to add texture to our brush print using the section “Texture” (Texture)!
Or you can go to the study of other parameters of the dynamics of the brush on the links below:

  • “Dynamics of form”
  • “Texture”
  • “Double brush”
  • “Color Dynamics”

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